Phenomenology

Download Collected Papers, Volume 5: Phenomenology and the Social by Alfred Schütz PDF

By Alfred Schütz

Alfred Schutz. Collected Papers V. Phenomenology and the Social Sciences, ed. through Lester Embree. Springer, 2011. 314 Pages (Phaenomenologica, Vol. 205)

Book Description
This publication exhibits how phenomenology of the social sciences differs from positivistic ways, and offers Schutz's thought of relevances--a key characteristic of his personal phenomenology of the social international. It starts with Schutz's appraisal of ways Husserl inspired him, and maintains with exchanges among Schutz and Eric Voegelin, Felix Kaufmann, Aron Gurwitsch, and Talcott Parsons. This publication offers, for the 1st time, Schutz's incisive criticisms of T.S. Eliot's idea of culture.

Editorial Reviews
This quantity starts with Schutz's caricature of the way Husserl inspired him. It indicates how phenomenological idea of the social sciences differs from positivistic techniques, and provides Schutz's concept of relevances--a key characteristic of his personal phenomenology of the social international. It includes exchanges among Schutz and Eric Voegelin, Felix Kaufmann, Aron Gurwitsch, and Talcott Parsons, and offers, for the 1st time, Schutz's incisive criticisms of T.S. Eliot's concept of culture.

Book Details
Hardcover: 312 pages
Publisher: Springer; 2011 version (August 31, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 9400715145
ISBN-13: 978-9400715141
Printed e-book Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.8 x 9.2 inches

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Extra resources for Collected Papers, Volume 5: Phenomenology and the Social Sciences (Phaenomenologica, Volume 205)

Sample text

The element of order in concrete phenomena consists in the fact that their values stand in certain constant modes of relation to each other. The order consists in these modes of relation plus the constancy of definition of the elements of the theoretical framework within their range of variation. The values of analytical elements are concrete data, facts of observation or combinations of facts. Hence the action scheme as a framework of analytical 16 The Theory of Social Action: Text and Letters with Talcott Parsons elements takes on a different meaning from that which it has as a descriptive schema.

But first of all, we should show that the above conception of scientific knowledge is incompatible with the subjective point of view which Parsons correctly proclaims to be a fundamental element of the theory of action. It is true that the term “scientific” does not mean that the actor’s so-called “scientific” elements of knowledge must have been verified by an empirical science. It is sufficient that the actors in the social world presume those elements to be verifiable by empirical science. But whether to be verified or merely to be verifiable: both categories are categories of the observer’s knowledge, more precisely, of the knowledge of the scientist who observes acts and actors within the social world; both are therefore categories peculiar to the objective point of view.

Thus the action is determined by the project including the in-order-to motive. The project is the intended act imagined as already completed. The in-order-to motive is the future state of affairs to be realized by the projected action, and the project itself is determined by the because motive. The complexes of meaning which constitute the inorder-to motive and the because motive differ from one another in that the first is an integral part of the action itself, whereas the latter requires a special act of reflection in the pluperfect tense, which will be carried out by the actor only if there are sufficient pragmatic reasons for his doing so.

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